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Cultural Diversity Celebrated Through Disneyland Resort Language Pins

¡Hola! Me llamo Betsy y hablo español.

It’s true. I speak Spanish and I love that I am able to share a small piece of my culture and heritage through my Disneyland name tag. Better than that, I’m able to help guests who may need some directions or help in Spanish and that’s true for nearly 3,000 of my fellow cast members – some of whom speak three and four languages.

Disneyland Resort cast members began wearing language pins in 2001. More than 30 languages including Arabic, Korean, Portuguese, Welsh and even Zulu are spoken at the Resort.

Check out the video below to meet some of the cast members who use language pins to connect with guests like you every day.

Comments

  • Thank you for including American Sign Language in the video. 🙂

  • Its great that American Sign Language (ASL) is featured. I had an amazing time when I went to WDW in January thanks to the interpreters there. Unfortunately, Deaf people are unable to have equal access to the videos on this blog because they are not captioned.

  • This video made me really excited, because this is exactly why I’m in school! I’m currently earning a degree in Spanish, and starting next year I’ll be working towards a certificate in American Sign Language because I want to work at Disneyland and interpret. This pretty much made my day! 🙂

  • Mary from Santa Barbara, CA
    This is amazing in how diverse the cast members are, but at the same point this is why there is so many fans all over the world who love Disney and their parks. When I was a cast member I had so much pride even though I only speak english, its just the way Disney’s cast members love to be there for their guest in anyway they can.

  • I am curious, what is the level of proficiency required to get the language pin and how is it verified?

    It is a great program

  • I had no concept of how many languages are spoke in the DLR! Clearly, another reason why Disney’s treatment of guests continues to be among the best in the theme park entertainment business. As newly initiated annual passholder at WDW in Orlando, Florida, I couldn’t be happier! <3

  • It is one of the most resourceful uses of the diverse group of cast members that work for Disney Parks.

    I also want to know who gets to produce all of these cool video interviews 🙂

  • This is awesome. Disney is at it’s best when it is celebrating diversity and reaching out to all of it’s guests. This is why I choose to vacation there.

  • I first noticed the language pins during my visit last summer at Disneyland. This summer, I went to Disney World, and saw a lot more cast members with the language pins. Considering how many people around the world come to Disneyland and Disney World, it’s nice to see the diversity reflected in the Disney Parks Cast members.

  • I never realized the diversity of languages spoken by Disney Cast Members! That’s wonderful.

    Are the foreign language Park Guides updated whenever new events, parades, or attractions are added, like the regular English Park Guides? Or are they a more general guide with the daily schedule as a supplement?

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